Being "Above Average" in School

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Two of my children (I've been sponsoring them for about five years) have recently had a status update to  "Above  Average' in school. Needless to say, I am a very proud sponsor since they always write to me that they are working very hard and school! I was just wondering how common this is, like what percentage of children are average, above average, below average, etc. Also, if my children are Above Average, does that increase their odds of being accepted into the LDP program? Can I encourage them to apply for this? Sorry for all the questions :)
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Katie Keech Ostermeier

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Posted 5 years ago

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Susan

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What I found was that the school performance designation is a bit subjective as it is decided and recorded by the center staff based on how they feel that particular child is doing in school. However, the "Average" designation is given to the majority of our children. "Above Average" is the second most common designation, with "Below Average" being the least common. 



It also varies by country:

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Katie Keech Ostermeier

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This is so interesting! I didn't expect this detail - thanks so much! As a researcher, I love data :) Do you know why there is such variation? Do the centers in Colombia have more of an effect on educational outcomes than Bolivia, or are the workers just more prone to report kids a certain way?

I think that this would make an excellent blog post, by the way. 
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Sandy Montoya

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I wondered that too about Colombia since I have three girls there and two are "above average." Their letters reflect that though. I've also seen that my children from South American countries are much more advanced educationally than my kids in Africa. My 8-yr-old girl in Colombia writes long, detailed letters while my 8-yr-old in Kenya still has hers written by tutors, as does my 8-yr-old in Rwanda. I encourage all my kids in their education, but spend extra time and thought putting words into letters for my kids who are struggling in school. 
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Susan

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Katie, I might just have to write a blog post then. :) Stay tuned! 

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