Graduation Percentage Rate

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Not to be a huge pain in the butt, but are there resources available from which I could figure out things like the percentage of kids who graduate the program, what countries have the highest/lowest drop out rates, or what ages/genders are most likely to drop out? My brain went all statistic crazy while I was driving around today and I'm quite curious about these things.
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Lindsay

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Posted 4 years ago

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Susan, Sponsor and Donor Relations, Social Media

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Hi Lindsay! I am hoping I can help ease the crazy a little with some stats that I have on hand. If you have any other questions, just ask. :)

In general, we lump all children who leave the program (not just those who graduate) together in our statistics. For example, we look at the most common reason that children are leaving the program by region. In Africa, it is a tie between completion and moving out of the area. For Asia and Latin America, the top reasons are that they were taken out of the program by guardians and that they moved out of the area. On average, the children who leave our program were in our program for a total of 8.8 years. We register children under ten so a child could have start the program as late as nine years old. Togo has the lowest rate of children/adolescents leaving the program (Togo is also quite a small country). On the other hand, Brazil has the highest departure rate. 

You might find this interesting as well. Many institutions measure their success based on completion rates. Here at Compassion, we have spent quite a bit of time thinking about what it means for our ministry to succeed and how to really measure what we are doing. We recognize both impact and outcomes. Impact is the fundamental long-term changes that we are making in children, families, churches, communities, etc. Because impact is long-term, we can't really take a snapshot of how we are doing as much. This is why we use what we call outcomes. We define outcomes as positive changes in the participant's behavior, knowledge, skills, or status. We measure outcomes at key milestones in that person's development. Because we are holistic, we are looking at outcomes in the spiritual, physical, cognitive, and socio-emotional realms. All of our countries are currently at 98% of meeting the outcomes we set forward in physical and socio-emotional areas. Ecuador and Rwanda have the highest percentages in the cognitive outcomes. For spiritual outcomes, Rwanda and Uganda have the highest percentages.
(Edited)
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Lindsay

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Yes, that's fantastic information! Thank you!
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Chak

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Thanks Susan!