how come the $45 a month I give towards my sponsor child does not help with food? $45 a month in Tanzania is a lot of money.

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renee

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  • concerned

Posted 2 years ago

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KristenH, Champion

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HI Renee, each individual Center covers different things depending of the needs of the children/families in their project. If you go on your account you can see exactly what your child's Center provides.
I've included a screenshot from one of my kids to give an example of what his Center provides to the kids.
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Katherine

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Hi Renee! Your monthly support actually does contribute to providing food for Musa. When a child enters the Compassion program, they are given a full health assessment. If they have nutrition deficits, they are given food and vitamin supplements and their guardian is counseled on good nutrition and sanitation. Each time the child attends the project they will receive a meal or hearty snack, depending on the time of day. All projects are lead by local staff who design meals according to local custom. Thank you for being such a blessing to Musa! I see that you are pretty new to sponsoring with Compassion, so please continue to reach out to us when you have questions!
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KristenH, Champion

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Might I also suggest talking to sponsors who have been in the field who have seen first hand how the funds are being used. It seems you might be a bit unsure about the program, so maybe hearing unfiltered views from those who don't work for the organization could provide some peace of mind! That's why I sought out other sponsors years ago when I first started sponsoring.

If you join the Facebook group there are a ton of sponsors who have sponsored for years and many that visited their children. (it's hidden on facebook so you'll have to request on here to join - we share personal info there so it's best to keep it hidden)
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renee

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Thank you!
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renee

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I read what it covers but I also read that my sponsored child only goes once a week so does that mean he only gets nutritional food once a week? I looked in to taking my daughter to visit him but it was almost 8500 round trip to where he lives in Tanzania. Bummer.
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Katherine

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Renee, I am curious to know where you read that Musa attends the center only once each week. A seven year old in Tanzania typically goes to the student center on Saturdays and for a few hours after school each weekday. If a child and their family is in need of extra nutritional support, Compassion is able to help supply that. We certainly don't want children walking away hungry! On a typical program day in Tanzania for a child around Musa's age, the children arrive at 8 o'clock. After prayers and a cleanliness inspection, they are given porridge with tea served with snacks, possibly an egg and bread. After the program, at about 1pm, they get a meal that may comprise rice and beef, beans and fruit, or ugali and beans or beef.

I pray that you and your daughter will get a chance to visit Musa one day! I personally have not yet had the chance to visit my sponsored children, but I have heard that it is an AMAZING experience! At the very least, we know we will meet them one day in heaven... but I know it would be nice to see them sooner :).
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Jennifer

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I am one of those sponsors who got to see a program first-hand.  I was always satisfied with Compassion, but what I saw far exceeded my expectations.  At the center I visited, the program was run almost exclusively by volunteers (only 3 paid staff with >200 kids), but those in teaching roles were required to be qualified teachers.  Not only that, they were GOOD teachers.  In one class the Bible story was taught with repetition and hands-on activities, but the teacher also seamlessly integrated language learning since the language spoken at school is different than what they speak at home.  In another class, itty-bitty kids learned about setting up mosquito nets and how to keep a clean house that won't attract mosquitoes.  They also learn social skills (through games), how to count money/barter, and about nutritious food choices.  Hand-washing was HIGHLY emphasized.  These kids bring what they learn home, and then it gets passed on from person to person, changing communities.  I know it doesn't seem very glamorous to pay for a program compared with something concrete for the family (which can also be done through child/family gifts), but these kids grow up in this environment, adding to their learning of various spiritual, economic, social, and health-related topics week by week, which leads to them being healthier, better adjusted, and more economically independent.  And more hopeful!

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