How many sponsored children have the opportunity to attend college?

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Hi!  My sponsored child, Sulika, will be turning 17 this December.  I was thinking this morning about how old she's getting (I've sponsored her since 2008) and how close she is getting to be college aged.  It put me to thinking, I wonder if she will get the chance to go to college??  I've always thought, through reading her letters, that she seems to be a very bright and motivated girl, and if she does want to go to college in the future, I need to start saving now so I can give her a nice monetary gift at that time.  So I do have several questions:  If she does get the opportunity to go to college, will Compassion notify me, or will I only know if she tells me in a letter?  Also, is it appropriate to ask her in a letter if she is thinking about going to college?  And lastly, I'm curious to know if there are any statistics as to what percentage of sponsored kids do move on to college or some kind of vocational school after their regular schooling?  Thanks!!!



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Anne Oliver

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Posted 2 years ago

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Susan, Sponsor and Donor Relations, Social Media

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Hi Anne!

That is so sweet of you to want to help her attend college! You are more than welcome to start saving and send a gift around that time. We do not typically notify supporters if their child has the opportunity to go to college. This is something you would keep up with in the letters. I think it is definitely appropriate and I would encourage you to ask Sulika if she is planning to go to university or some other vocational training school. 

You may be aware that up until a year ago we had a program called the Leadership Development Program. It was through this program that we helped graduates of the sponsorship program go to university and also receive leadership training. This program was very selective, and regrettably, very few of our graduates were able to go through this program. We have since transitioned out of the Leadership Development as a separate program and made some of the same opportunities and training available to all of our sponsorship students.

At age twelve, we begin our "My Plan for Tomorrow" curriculum with each student. Part of this curriculum involves receiving a mentor at the center who will help the student dream and make plans for the future. Our goal for all of our children is that they would graduate our program as responsible and fulfilled, Christian adults. A large part of this is being able to somehow support themselves and their families once they are done with the program. We also have an understanding that university is not for all of the kids in our programs, but we want all of them to have some form of vocational or career training. We support them in some way receiving this training whether it is done at the student center or they receive help towards tuition somewhere else. That said, we are usually not able to fully cover these expenses and an extra gift from the supporter is often helpful to the family. 

Regrettably, I do not have any statistics on the percentage of all of our students who attend vocational and university education. That said, every student has to do one or the other. Anecdotally, most kids attend vocational school through the Compassion program after or near the end of their traditional schooling and very few go on to university. 
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Anne Oliver

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Thanks for the info!  I will definitely ask Sulika if she has any dreams of going to university.  One last question: the few kids that to do go on to university, how do they usually pay for it seeing as how the Leadership Development Program is no longer available?  Do they get scholarships? Or is it largely through generous gifts from their sponsor?  Thanks! 

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Sarah, Sponsor and Donor Relations, Social Media

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Many of them most likely do receive scholarships or assistance in some form. The center staff are well versed in knowledge about where to receive help and they work with the students to figure out a plan for each of them who will be attending school :).
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Anne Oliver

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So, I just had a notification this morning on the Compassion website that I had a new letter from Sulika, and in her letter she told me that she is attending college.  I was really surprised!  She's in India, so I'm wondering when she writes to me about being in college now, is she talking about University? Or would she be referring to some kind of vocational schooling?  I'm assuming that the college she is talking about is different from her primary education, because she was talking about missing her old friends at school, but liking her new friends at college. Anyway I do plan on writing back very soon with more questions about what she is studying, etc.... Overall, I think it is one of the most personal letters I've ever read from her, and I was very happy to read it.
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Adam

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That's great news, Anne!
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Katherine

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Hi Anne! It's great to hear that you received such a personal letter from Sulika! Our last case study for her was updated about a year ago, so that doesn't mention anything about her attending college, of course. However, I took a look at her most recent letter and the part about obtaining a BA in English makes me think she's attending formal university and not vocational training! I would definitely ask her about that in your next letter. What wonderful news! :)
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Marcelle Dotson

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This reply was created from a merged topic originally titled University Education.

My child has always had his heart set on attending university. Now that he has reached the age, he went to register but did not have the money for the tuition fees. What are his options for being able to continue his education? He is an orphan and the only family he has is a sickly brother. Does compassion offer any educational assistance? Who should he weak with?  any help would be greatly appreciated.  Mu original plan was to support him through the LDP, but now that that is no longer an option, what can be done?  
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Sarah, Sponsor and Donor Relations, Social Media

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Hi Marcelle! Thank you so much for the love and care you have shown to Sibomana through the years and for desiring his dreams to be feasible!  The Leadership Development Program has been phased out due to its very selective nature. This program was very selective, and regrettably, very few of our graduates were able to go through this program. We have since then made some of the same opportunities and training available to all of our sponsorship students. Our goal for all of our children is that they would graduate our program as responsible and fulfilled, Christian adults. A large part of this is being able to somehow support themselves and their families once they are done with the program. Attending university is not always an option for all of the kids in our programs, but we do want all of them to have some form of vocational training. Compassion is usually not able to fully cover the expenses for a child to attend university. Sibomana's tutor and project director will have been and will continue to work with him regarding his education options. If you would like to supplement his education, a family gift, which can be given between $25- $1,000 per calendar year, may be one way you can assist him. I cannot guarantee that he will use it for his education, but we can suggest he use it for schooling. Keep praying for this sweet young man too, Marcelle! The Lord has plans for him that are greater than anything we can imagine.