I want to bring Moringa to my sponsored child and his community

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My sponsored child, Prince, turned 9 today. It's his birthday. He seems to be a bright, good, loving child. But every photograph I see of him there is never a smile. He is thin, and his skin is ashen. Our child development center partner for Prince's area, Awadesh, says that malnutrition is one of many problems their community is facing. I think I can see that in Prince's face. I want very much to help, and I think I have an idea on how I could do that.
Please watch the below documentary on the Moringa tree. I am not sure if there are any Moringa trees in Prince's geographic region but climate wise I think it would grow very well. This is truly a life-giving plant. I have been consuming Moringa powder and tea for a year or two now and the nutrients it provides me are making a huge difference in my life and health. There are many other benefits to the whole Moringa plant besides all the nutrients and antioxidants - it provides oils, it's one of the most complete plant proteins, and can be used for water purification.

I want to give Prince a Moringa tree, and a support network to learn how to take care of it and use it. I don't know what the logistics of that look like - there may be laws and eco/bio concerns about planting a new species and all kinds of obstacles...but they don't scare me. I hope there is someone here who can help me figure out how to do this. Please help!

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Lydia Anthony

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Posted 5 years ago

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Pamela Monahan Berkeley

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Have we talked about this? Last summer I totally decided I wanted to get a moringa tree; still hasn't happened, there was a hiccup, but I had found an online seller who was selling seeds for 100 rupees. :) I'll see what I can find. Where is Prince located?
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Emily

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Lydia, I'm so encouraged that your heart is invested in not only sponsoring Prince but wanting to do everything you can to ensure he grows up healthy and strong. I can tell you care so deeply for him and we appreciate you as a sponsor! It can be a harsh realization learning that these areas struggle with malnutrition, especially when your child who is close to your heart is in that area. But I want to encourage you that this is where your support becomes such an incredible blessing! Often times, children do come into our program that in the past, have not received the proper nutrition that they need. 

When a child comes into the Compassion program, they are given a full health assessment. If they have nutrition deficits, they are given food and vitamin supplements and their guardian is counseled on good nutrition and sanitation. Each time Prince attends the project he receives a meal or hearty snack, depending on the time of day. Now that he's in our program, he will continue to receive scheduled health and dental monitoring to ensure he maintains good health.

I want to encourage you that when Prince received his most recent health assessment, he was reported as a healthy growing boy! :) This is such great news and we will continue to monitor his health during his time in our program and teach him how to maintain a healthy lifestyle and the importance of proper nutrition as he grows! 

I appreciate your desire to provide a Moringa tree for Prince and his family. Moringa tree grows mainly in semi-arid tropical and sub-tropical areas. Regrettably, it would be difficult to grow something like this in his area as he lives in a climate that is very dry. It also might be difficult if his family didn't have the land or resources to sustain such a tree. Please rest assured however, that because your boys project is staffed by local, indigenous people who live in that community, they know very well what types of food can best be grown in that area and provide for Prince and if he and his family have the resources and live in an environment that they're able to grow their own food, they can help provide him with the knowledge and skills to grow food that will thrive where he lives :). 

You're certainly welcome to send a family gift if you feel led! You can send a gift from $25-$1000 and make a note that you'd like for it to be used to help the family with food they may need, supplies, or for the resources to begin growing their own food if possible. Our staff will help Prince and his family decide the wisest way to use your generous gift to help ensure it's used for the most pressing need they have right now. 
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Lydia Anthony

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Thank you for your thoughtful and thorough response, Emily! I will think on an amount and way to specify the need I would like to help address. I wonder if a community garden at the child development center would be a good idea...? I would love Prince and his friends to be able to learn to grow tasty and nutritious veggies.
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Emily

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Hi Lydia! That's a great idea! :) I'd even encourage you to write a letter to your kiddo asking if there is already a garden being grown at the center or if he's learning about gardening. Along with family gifts, you're also welcome to consider sending a project gift which the center will be able to use to improve the center and benefit all children at the project, and maybe that greatest need is materials for a garden :). Project gifts can be anywhere from $100-$2000 once per year. When you send gifts, you will receive a thank you letter within six months, letting you know how your gift was used!

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