Letters only from my sponsor child's father

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The two letters I've gotten so far have been from my sponsor dauhter's father. She has drawn pictures at the top and written a Beverse, so I know she's capable. I would just like to be able to build a relationship with her and feel like I'm not.
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Erin Bañuelos

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Posted 8 years ago

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Erin Bañuelos

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*that was supposed to say Bible verse not Beverse.
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abrooke2002

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I have a child in Ecuador and seemed to only get letters from her mother. I called Compassion and they encouraged me to be patient, that it could be because the child is shy and uncertain. They suggested that in my next letter I write something like, "I would love for Litzy to practice her writing. Can she write me her favorite _____?" I didn't have time to try it. I got a letter from my child within a week. Just a thought.
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Shaina Moats

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Hey Erin! How old is she? I sponsor a girl in Bolivia and her sister or mom write to me each time I hear from her. She is able to copy sentences from the chalkboard or a book, but not able to form a letter yet.
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Erin Bañuelos

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This may be it....she's 8. The pictures she draws and her handwriting seem so advanced for her age though, I just figured she should be able to write a few sentences. It's not a huge deal as her father is very thankful for the sponsorship, I just wish I could get to know her a little more.
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Leslie Allen Taylor

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As much as I would like to have each of my kids write to me, the next best thing is when a family member writes. I think it is wonderful that her father is writing to you. I have a 12-year-old boy in Uganda whose letters are written by the translator and says "Your child wants you to know" and then some information. Then I have another 9-year-old boy in Uganda who writes his own letters to me in English. I would just be happy to receive letters and form a relationship with the father and, like the others said, the daughter will write eventually.
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Shaina Moats

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Yes, I believe she is too young to write her own letters yet Erin. Normally, children will begin to write around 10-12 years old.
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Erin Bañuelos

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Thanks for the replies! It just gets confusing sometimes because I'm supposed to write to her, but then I don't get any response to the questions I ask her and if her dad asks me a question, I'm like "Tell your dad ___________". I am very thankful to even get letters, but like I said, I get confused as to whom to speak to in the letters.
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Shaina Moats

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I normally will say something like:

Dear Angela,

I hope you are well! Please tell your sister/mother thank you for their thoughtful letter.

I'll answer any questions that were in the letter, but I normally always write to Angela directly. Hope this helps! :)
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Becky, Champion

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Hi Erin, I've found from other sponsors that some kids (or their parents/family members) are better than others at answering questions in letters and some project staff are better than others at seeing questions in letters get answered also. I think some of it has to do with how so they get my letter in relation to how soon my child writes back (each of my kids writes 3x/year although the new letter writing overhaul will change that for the better in my case as I write alot). I have tried the following to get my questions answered and sometimes it works wonderfully, and other times I do not get answers to my questions.

I will number my questions, star them and sometimes also underline or highlight them to emphasize how important they are to me (and the translator who translates the letters). I limit my questions to 3 per letter at most. I also include a statement such as 'I would like to learn more about you. I have several questions about you that I would like answered.' I do wish there was a method for our kids to understand the cultural divide between us asking questions and expecting answers versus alot of cultures feeling strange about answering questions and even if we want the questions answered. However, in many cases I think I am the one who needs to adjust to their culture a bit more rather than them to me :-) I got all of these suggestions from CI staff and other sponsors on ourcompassion.org

Another support thread about children and questions in letters: http://support.compassion.com/compass...

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