My plan for tomorrow doesn't seem to be helping my child

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My sponsor child wants to be an engineer. I heard that engineer major is a 5 year university program in Ethiopia. My child just turned 16 years old and he is in grade 5.
I heard from Compassion that he had to do grade 5 again to improve his studies. By the time he completes Compassion, he will most likely be grade 11. When children write my plan for tomorrow every year, I heard they set a goal to achieve their dream. Seeing how my child is progressing in school and the reality is that without any financial help, he will not be able to go to university. When he does my plan for tomorrow, does Compassion let him write what he wants to be although reality is nearly impossible? If he wants to be an engineer, he needs to study until 28 years old. And I am worried that he is not doing well in school since he needs to repeat grade 5 again. I want to know how my plan for tomorrow activity is being beneficial to my child. As for now, it seems like it will be a challenge for him yo be an engineer seeing how he is doing in school and also financial problem.

If it seems impossible in reality then does Compassion staff tell children the truth or ask them if they are interested in something else? How does my plan for tomorrow currently working for my child Wogayehu Demilew?

If he is willing to study hard and really want to be an engineer then I am willing to help him with university tuition fee in the future. But I have not told him as I dont want to promise anything yet. Also, he is still in high school when he grsduates from Compassion program.
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Jenny Kim

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Posted 2 years ago

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William Blair

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Hi Jenny. You only need to pray for him and encourage him to believe he can do it. Having to repeat 5th grade is only a minor setback. I just read an article that successful people do not fear failure. They use it as a learning experience. Who hasn't failed at some things in life? Tell him about people like Thomas Edison. He tried so many times to get it right. He didn't give up.
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Sarah, Sponsor and Donor Relations, Social Media

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I think he would love that, Jenny! Even just seeing your response to his dream will encourage him in more ways than you will know :)!
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Beth

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Sarah, Thanks for sharing the link to the My Plan for Tomorrow curriculum. I watched the video. It's always nice to learn more about what my sponsored kids are doing. What age do they start the curriculum at? Is it used in every Compassion center?
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Sarah, Sponsor and Donor Relations, Social Media

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Hi Beth! The children begin to use the curriculum when they turn twelve years old, and yes we do use it in every center :). I'm so glad you enjoyed the video!
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Beth

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Thanks, Sarah. It's good to know what age they do this curriculum. Maybe it's something we could ask about in the letters.

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Leeanna A Glasby

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This is so tough, but encourage your child to study, pray for your child.  I guess I have nothing new to add.  Just really hoping for each child to be provided for now, and able to dream for the future, but having a plan A, B, or C.  Sometimes maybe children just need the guidance to seek a quick employment plan, a basic skill, but to remember their dream and use it as a future launching pad or else dream for their own children and to read, read, read about their passion.
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William Blair

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I was in Bolivia last month on an individual visit and I learned that when students in poverty take entrance exams to universities and pass they go to school for free.  That's in Bolivia, I'm not sure about how many other countries do that. Once your sponsor child gets to that point he believes he can do it his dream will come true.

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