Oldest Children

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I have just been browsing around on the site (dangerous I know...) and noticed now many older children/young adults there are. 

I was looking at the number of 20/21 year olds and was wondering how much longer they have got left at the project. I love the idea of being able to send them some encouragement before they leave (which may mean a couple of months of sponsorship), but wondering how quickly letters would get to them if they have less than a year left in the program.... 

Do they stay on the 'Sponsor a child' list right up to the point they leave?? 

Thanks 

Laura 
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Laura Handy

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Posted 5 years ago

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Debbie Skacel Tovar

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Compassion leaves them on the website usually until they have two years left, but they seem to be going a few months longer now with some of the kids.  The oldest on the website is 20.  They graduate when they are 22 years old, so the least you should have them is a year and 3/4, but, of course, they could graduate early.  It takes the same amount of time to get letters to them, usually two to three months.  
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Debbie Skacel Tovar

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I took an Indian girl a month ago because I love the college kids.  Usually I take the Filipino college kids, but now that they are listing Indian ones, I thought I would try it.
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Denise Bailey

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The US site usually takes them off at some point during the two years left and one year left.  However, on the Australian site I did sponsor a gal with only 4 months left.  I received an intro letter that was written before she was sponsored by me, general info and then she sent a final letter after she graduated.   Another time I called to find out if there were any students available at a center where a child had graduated and there were two young men with seven months left and I chose one of them to sponsor.  Both of these students were in Uganda and I sent them lots of materials as well as some financial assistance.  The young man bought a beautiful cow.  Not sure what the gal purchased.   I wish I could add some students now but I am truly maxed out right now from perusing the available children one time too often(lol)!  
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Emily

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Laura, thank you for your heart and wanting to encourage these older children during their final years/months in our program :). Along with what Debbie and Denise said, I also want to mention that the maximum completion age for most of our countries is 22 years old. However, we do have a few countries whose maximum completion age is still 18 years old including: Guatemala, Honduras, and Nicaragua. Our hope is to find these older teens loving sponsor's as quickly as possible so that they're able to receive support, motivation, and encouragement, during these critical last years in our program before they venture into a new season of their lives. 

If you have a heart to write to older children that are about to graduate, you might consider becoming a correspondent and request an older child :). 
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Sally

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I like the idea of sponsoring a young adult and offering them encouragement during the last portion of their sponsorship. I am currently looking on the website for an older teen girl to sponsor. I would like to be able to communicate in English. I hope that doesn't seem petty. Are their certain countries that are more likely to speak English?
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Debbie Skacel Tovar

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Philippines, all my older ones are English speaking, but there are the rare few that might not be.  India, you have a good chance.  Uganda for sure.  Tanzania is also a good chance.  I do have to say though, as far as correspondence kids, my very best older girl was from Thailand, and she didn't speak English.  Ghana, also is English, but you aren't going to find that many older ones as it's a newer country.
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Debbie Skacel Tovar

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I was just looking at the older kids.  Kenya also is English for sure, Rwanda is a maybe.  I do have to make a comment about encouragement.  I think I usually am getting more encouragement from these older kids than what I am able to give them.  They have struggled through a lot, and have somehow made it through, and they can really teach you a lot.  Most of my older ones just want to know there is someone there they can share with, and knowing that someone really believes in them.
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Sally

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Thanks so much Debbie. That helps a lot! I like the idea of being able to send various forms of literature and I would think it would be extremely tedious and not really feasible to ask someone to translate a few chapters of a book mailed at a time.  I did find a girl in India. Interestingly, it says she lives at her Center. I didn't know that certain centers actually housed children. I am going to pray about it before I commit.

I wondered about Rwanda. I have a 5 y/o girl there that we just started sponsoring. 
(Edited)
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Debbie Skacel Tovar

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Took me awhile to figure out which girl lived at the center.  It's common for girls to do that in India.  They have classes right at the center and they stay there for part of the year, and then go home.  With the one you are looking at, it could be her college is close to the center.  Many of the girls come from villages that are rather distant, and they probably get better schooling (the younger girls) right at the center.
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Sally

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That makes sense. Thanks Debbie.

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